Balsamic reduction (also known as balsamic glaze) is a single ingredient, versatile, foolproof sauce that makes any roasted vegetables taste delicious! All you need to make this recipe is balsamic vinegar, a saucepan, and about 20 minutes.

Drizzle balsamic reduction sauce on top of roasted vegetables, pasta dishes, salads, pizzas, grain bowls, and more to make them taste irresistible.

spoon dripping balsamic glaze into a jar

As a Registered Dietitian, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that roasted vegetables are one of my favorite foods.

Whether it’s roasted broccoli, roasted cauliflower, roasted beets, or roasted Brussels sprouts, I love how crisp, golden brown, and caramelized vegetables turn when roasted in the oven at high heat.

The one thing that makes roasted vegetables even better? A fantastic homemade sauce or dressing to add additional flavor!

This balsamic reduction sauce is an all-purpose sauce you can drizzle on any type of vegetable, like my maple balsamic roasted brussels sprouts, balsamic roasted root vegetables and balsamic roasted cabbage wedges.

I dare you to find a type of veggie that doesn’t taste amazing with this syrupy, sweet, and tangy sauce.

Plus, it’s incredibly easy to make and requires just one ingredient: balsamic vinegar.

You don’t have to reserve this sauce for roasted vegetables – try it on salads (it’s so good with a caprese salad), pasta dishes, pizzas, grain bowls, sandwiches, dips, and as a glaze for salmon or tofu.

Follow my instructions below for how to make balsamic glaze!

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Pour balsamic vinegar into a small pot made of non-reactive material. Heat it up on the stovetop over high heat until it boils.
  2. Reduce the heat to low-medium, so the vinegar is at a rapid simmer – just below boiling. You want to see small bubbles in the vinegar.
  3. Continue to simmer like this for 15-20 minutes, until the vinegar liquid has reduced by half to two-thirds. Remove from heat.
  4. Once it is ready, the reduction will have a thicker, syrupy consistency and lightly coat the back of a spoon.
balsamic vinegar in a pot
hand spooning balsamic glaze in a small pot
balsamic reduction being poured from a pot into a glass jar

Recipe tips

  • Use a basic balsamic vinegar. If you have a fancy, expensive bottle of balsamic vinegar, don’t use it to make balsamic reduction, because it’s will already be thick and sweet due to the longer aging process. This recipe is the best way to make a lower quality balsamic vinegar taste amazing!
  • Turn on your vent. Heating balsamic vinegar on the stovetop will make your kitchen smell strongly of balsamic vinegar. Put your vent on (or crack a window) to lessen the smell.
  • Cook balsamic reduction in non-reactive cookware. Since vinegar is highly acidic, it is best to use non-reactive cookware to make this recipe, otherwise you may end up with a metallic flavor. Non-reactive cookware materials include stainless steel, glazed ceramic, or enamel-coated cookware.
  • Optional: add sweetener. Some balsamic reduction recipes call for the addition of a sweetener. If you prefer a sweeter balsamic glaze, add a few tablespoons of maple syrup, honey, or brown sugar.

Storing balsamic reduction

Transfer your balsamic reduction to a glass jar or airtight container.

Store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator and use within 1-2 months.

roasted root vegetables with balsamic glaze drizzled

Let me know if you love this post by leaving a comment or star rating below, and check out Instagram and Pinterest for more healthy lifestyle inspiration. Thanks for stopping by!

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spoon dripping balsamic glaze into a jar

DIY Balsamic Vinegar Reduction Sauce for Roasted Vegetables

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  • Author: Alex Aldeborgh, RD
  • Prep Time: 1 minute
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 21 minutes
  • Yield: about 1/3 cup 1x
  • Category: sauces and dressings
  • Method: stovetop
  • Cuisine: American Italian
  • Diet: Vegan
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Description

Balsamic reduction (also known as balsamic glaze) is a single ingredient, versatile, foolproof sauce that makes any roasted vegetables taste delicious! All you need to make this recipe is balsamic vinegar, a saucepan, and about 20 minutes.

Drizzle balsamic reduction sauce on top of roasted vegetables, pasta dishes, salads, pizzas, grain bowls, and more to make them taste irresistible.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 1/2 cups balsamic vinegar


Instructions

  1. Pour balsamic vinegar into a small pot made of non-reactive material, such as stainless steel.
  2. Bring the vinegar to a boil on the stovetop.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium-low so the vinegar is at a rapid simmer, with small bubbles forming.
  4. Cook for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the vinegar has reduced by one-half to two-thirds, and it has thickened to a syrupy consistency.
  5. Remove from heat and store in a glass jar.

Notes

Recipe tips

  • Use a basic balsamic vinegar. If you have a fancy, expensive bottle of balsamic vinegar, don’t use it to make balsamic reduction, because it’s will already be thick and sweet due to the longer aging process. This recipe is the best way to make a lower quality balsamic vinegar taste amazing!
  • Turn on your vent. Heating balsamic vinegar on the stovetop will make your kitchen smell strongly of balsamic vinegar. Put your vent on (or crack a window) to lessen the smell.
  • Cook balsamic reduction in non-reactive cookware. Since vinegar is highly acidic, it is best to use non-reactive cookware to make this recipe, otherwise you may end up with a metallic flavor. Non-reactive cookware materials include stainless steel, glazed ceramic, or enamel-coated cookware.
  • Optional: add sweetener. Some balsamic reduction recipes call for the addition of a sweetener. If you prefer a sweeter balsamic glaze, add a few tablespoons of maple syrup, honey, or brown sugar.